The Path to Agility conference was developed to further COHAA’s mission to promote the use of Agile practices and principles. COHAA has engaged a number of national and regional Agile thought leaders to provide session content focused on a mix of business, technical, and/or management topics. Whether you are well along the path or just starting out, this conference will help guide you in the right direction.

Date: May 25, 2016—May 26, 2016
Event: The Path to Agility Conference
Topic: The Business of Agile: Better, Faster, Cheaper
Sponsor: Central Ohio Agile Association (COHAA)
Venue: The Ohio Union
614-688-4636
Location: 1739 N. High Street
Columbus, OH 43210
United States
Public: Public
Registration: Click here to register.

AFH 032: How to Improve Your Agile Conference Submissions [PODCAST]

Hosts

Ryan Ripley, Don Gray, Tim Ottinger, Amitai Schlair, Jason Tice

Discussion

Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley), Don Gray (@donaldegray), Tim Ottinger (@tottinge), Amitai Schlair (@schmonz), and Jason Tice (@theagilefactor) got together to discuss strategies for submitting talks to agile conferences and how to help the chances of your presentation getting accepted.

**DISCLAIMER: This is an independent podcast that is not affiliated with or represents the views of any of the conferences mentioned on the show.

Every person on the podcast speaks at conferences across the United States and around the world. We’ve also had our talks rejected at many conferences as well. While there isn’t a silver bullet that guarantees success in this space, there are ways to increase the odds that your talk will fit in with the needs of the organizers and delight the attendees.

It’s our hope that this episode helps those new to public speaking get their ideas out in to the world and to give veterans of the conference scene fresh ideas on how to get more of their talks potentially accepted.

And then…we called it a night.

Will you help the Agile for Humans podcast grow? Please review Agile for Humans on iTunes or Stitcher and leave your comments on the blog site. Help your friends and co-workers find Agile for Humans by sharing your favorite episodes with them. Thanks for all you do to support the show.

Agile for Humans is brought to you by audible.com – get one FREE audiobook download and 30 day free trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/agile

Resources, Plugs, and More

Ryanhttp://ryanripley.com

Donhttp://www.donaldegray.com/

Timhttp://agileotter.blogspot.com/

Amitaihttp://www.schmonz.com/

Jasonhttp://www.thisagilelife.com/

AFH 031: Natural Software Development using #NoEstimates and Variable Length Sprints [PODCAST]

Hosts

Ryan Ripley, Ron Quartel, Amitai Schlair

Discussion

Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley), Ron Quartel (@agileagitator) and Amitai Schlair (@schmonz) got together to discuss a real live #NoEstimates project, variable length sprints, the power of the sprint goal, and true software craftsmanship.

Ron joined us back on episode 10 to discuss Fast Agile and came back to talk about a project he recently kicked off at a major corporation that uses #NoEstimates practices and modifications to the scrum framework.

We talked through common concerns and questions that come up when discussing these topics and even highlighted some patterns that seem to be emerging from these #NoEstimates experiments.

And then…we called it a night.

Will you help the Agile for Humans podcast grow? Please review Agile for Humans on iTunes or Stitcher and leave your comments on the blog site. Help your friends and co-workers find Agile for Humans by sharing your favorite episodes with them. Thanks for you do to support the show.

Agile for Humans is brought to you by audible.com – get one FREE audiobook download and 30 day free trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/agile

Resources, Plugs, and More

Ryanhttp://ryanripley.com

Ronhttp://agileagitator.blogspot.com

Amitaihttp://www.schmonz.com/

AFH 030: Product Backlog Management with Tim Ottinger and Mark Davidson [PODCAST]

Hosts

Ryan Ripley, Tim Ottinger, Mark Davidson

Discussion

Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley), Tim Ottinger (@tottinge) and Mark Davidson (@AgileDelivery) got together to discuss the role of the Product Owner (PO) and Product Backlog Management.

Topics ranged from Minimum Viable Product (MVP), Story Mapping, Product Backlog Item creation, and what to do when the backlog becomes unruly.

A key take away form this episode is the power and importance of a physical card wall. Having a space where everything known about a product or project is visible can make or break an agile project. Such an area gives teams the space to discuss, solution, and celebrate.

The tactile nature of cards also has an impact on team members that a tool cannot yet replicate.

Alignment is a great benefit of card walls, as is the ability to ask a basic question:

“How do we know that this product / project is a good idea?”

We wrapped up with the psychological impacts of a backlog on a team.

And then…we called it a night.

Will you help the Agile for Humans podcast grow? Please review Agile for Humans on iTunes or Stitcher and leave your comments on the blog site. Help your friends and co-workers find Agile for Humans by sharing your favorite episodes with them. Thanks for all you do to support the show.

Agile for Humans is brought to you by audible.com – get one FREE audiobook download and 30 day free trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/agile

Resources, Plugs, and More

Ryanhttp://ryanripley.com

Timhttp://industriallogic.com

Markhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/medavidson

AFH 029: Beyond Legacy Code with David Bernstein and Woody Zuill [PODCAST]

Hosts

Ryan Ripley, David Bernstein, Woody Zuill

Discussion

Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley), David Bernstein (@tobeagile) and Woody Zuill (@WoodyZuill) got together to discuss legacy code, what it means to be a great programmer, test driven development, and how the principles that we adopt drive our practices.

At the center of our discussion was David’s new book: Beyond Legacy Code

This book now has a prominent place on my desk next to Uncle Bob Martin’s classic book  Clean Code. David starts the reader off with the current state of software development and why many of the problems that we observe and experience still persist today.

He calls this “The Legacy Code Crisis” and does a brilliant job of making the case for agile software development practices.

The second part of the book covers 9 practices that “extend the life and value of your software”.

The 9 practices are:

  1. Say What, Why, and for Whom Before How
  2. Build in Small Batches
  3. Integrate Continuously
  4. Collaborate
  5. Create Clean Code
  6. Write the Test First
  7. Specify Behaviors with Tests
  8. Implement the Design Last
  9. Refactor Legacy Code

Each practice is explained clearly along with why each practice is important. The “why” is critical. It’s easy to explain the mechanics of TDD, but also showing the value that the practice provides makes the book appropriate for programmers, managers, and executives alike.

My favorite aspect of this book is that David’s explanations and insights are infused with the values and principles of the agile manifesto.

His prose is engaging and feels conversational. It’s a pleasure to read David’s thoughts on these topics as he is clearly knowledgeable and passionate about agility and creating humane systems of work.

I love this book and cannot recommend it highly enough.

As Woody Zuill noted on the podcast: “If I had what it takes to write a book, I would like to have written this book.

And then…we called it a night.

Will you help the Agile for Humans podcast grow? Please review Agile for Humans on iTunes or Stitcher and leave your comments on the blog site. Help your friends and co-workers find Agile for Humans by sharing your favorite episodes with them. Thanks for you do to support the show.

Agile for Humans is brought to you by audible.com – get one FREE audiobook download and 30 day free trial at http://www.audibletrial.com/agile

Resources, Plugs, and More

Ryanhttp://ryanripley.com

Davidhttp://www.tobeagile.com/

Woodyhttp://zuill.us/WoodyZuill/